dB-SERC Calendar of Events

If you are a faculty member in a Natural Science department or a professional school at Pitt and would like to be added to our email list to receive information about dB-SERC events, please fill out this form.

If you are a graduate student in a Natural Science department and are interested in teaching and learning there are several ways you can get involved. Click here to find out more. 

dB-SERC News

Inclusion in Physics at Pitt

Dr. Chandralekha Singh, founder of dB-SERC, was featured in a recent Pitt Pulse article about women in physics. The article discusses womens' lower self-efficacy in the field and ways to increase womens' representation in physics including an intervention physics courses.


2021  dB-SERC Leader Awards

Congratulations to the eighteen faculty members who received dB-SERC Leader Awards this year! We thank them for their support and contributions to the dB-SERC community.   Read the full list of recipients and learn more about the award here.


2021 dB-SERC Course Transformation Awards

The reciepients of the 3 Course Transfomation Awards and 1 mentor mentee award for 2021 were featured in the University Times this week.  Read the full article online here.


Equity in Physics and Biology

This week, we saw two exciting new articles about equity in science.

In an opinion piece in Scientific American, dB-SERC founding director Dr. Chandralekha Singh explains how the coming “quantum computer revolution” will require a well-trained workforce that includes both men and women. In order to keep women in physics, Dr. Singh outlines a variety of cultural changes, such as positively recognizing students for their work, providing mentoring, and cutting out microaggressions.

Additionally, Dr. Singh along with Dr. Ericka McGreevy and Dr. Kevin Binning were featured in an article about the ecological-belonging interventions they developed.  A new article in PittWire describes the intervention and highlights success, including replications at Princeton and the Universities of Cincinnati and Minnesota. 


2019-2020 dB-SERC Leadership Awards

We are excited to share that 14 dB-SERC community members have been recognized for their leadership in our community. For more details, see the article at the University Times.


Fall 2020 SEISMIC Events

SEISMIC, a collaboration of 10 universities working together to improve equity in introductory STEM courses, has launched their Fall 2020 Speakers Bureau. A number of the talks will be of interest to the dB-SERC community. See the talk schedule on the SEISMIC website.


2020 dB-SERC Course Transformation Awards

The University Times this week has an article about the 2020 recipients of dB-SERC Course Transformation and Mentor/Mentee Awards. We are very proud of the 9 recipients of the Course Transformation Award and the 2 recipients of the Mentor/Mentee Award for 2020. Read the full article online here.


Belonging Intervention Fosters Success

Snapshot, the newsletter of the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, featured dB-SERC community members Dr. Ericka McGreevy, Dr. Kevin Binning, and Dr. Chandralekha Singh in a recent article. The feature describes their work to develop and implement an ecological belonging intervention in introductory biology and physics classes. The intervention has been shown to increase academic performance, attendance, and persistence, especially for students from historically underrepresented groups in those disciplines. For more, read the full article!


Inclusion and the 'Leaky Pipeline' at Pitt

Dr. Chandralekha Singh, founder of dB-SERC, along with Dr. Sarah Hainer and Dr. Alison Slinsky Legg from the biology department and Dr. Alaine Allen from engineering were featured in a recent PittWire article about bias in STEM. The article discusses intersectionality, inclusive practices, and the importance of recognition for students from underrepresented groups.


2019 dB-SERC Award Recipients

The 11 recipients of the 2019 dB-SERC Course Transformation Awards have been recognized in an article in the University Times, as have two of the recipients of the 2019 dB-SERC Mentor/Mentee Awards. We also congratulate Jordan Swisher, Dr. Ericka Huston, and Dr. Peter Bell, our most-recent recipeints of the Mentor/Mentee Award.


Congratulations Leadership Award Recipients!

The recipients of the 2018-2019 dB-SERC Leadership Award have been announced. See the list here.


Growth Mindset for New Faculty

At the 2019 orientation for new faculty, Provost Ann Cudd stressed the importance of adopting the growth mindset theory of intelligence when working with students. "We are here to create talent and develop a growth mindset," she said. This will sound familiar to dB-SERC community members, who have seen how important instructor mindset is for promoting the learning of all our students. For more, read the article in the University Times online.


dB-SERC Featured in University Times

Our founder, Dr. Chandralekha Singh, has been featured in a great article in the University Times this week. The piece outlines the challenges we face as educators, and how dB-SERC and our community -- including two-time Course Transformation Award recipient Dr. Kyle Whittinghill -- are working to improve both student learning and equity in our courses. Read the article online.


2019 CAS Future Leaders

We are delighted to hear that dB-SERC community member Dr. Paulette Vincent-Ruz was recognized as a 2019 Future Leader by CAS, a division of the American Chemical Society. Dr. Vincent-Ruz recently completed her PhD, and has been instrumental in supporting and assessing projects in many departments. Read more about Dr. Vincent-Ruz's well-deserved award.


2019 Chemistry Lab Safety Award

The Departments of Chemistry and Environmental Health & Safety, and especially dB-SERC community member Dr. Ericka Huston, have been recognized for their pioneering work in lab safety. They have been selected to receive the SafetyStratus College and University Health and Safety Award for developing the most comprehensive laboratory safety program in higher education, awarded by the Division of Chemical Health & Safety of the American Chemical Society. Be sure to find out more during Dr. Huston's dB-SERC lunch talks over the coming year!


2017-2018 dB-SERC Leadership Awards

13 dB-SERC members have been recognized for their leadership, contributions, and active engagement with our learning community. For more details, check out the article in the University Times.


Physics of Science Fiction

dB-SERC community member Dr Melanie Good (Physics) was profiled in the University Times for her unique class, the Physics of Science Fiction. Click here to read the article.


2018 dB-SERC Award Winners

The recipients of 9 major dB-SERC awards this year have been featured in the University Times this week. Congratulations!


CONGRATULATIONS 

  • to the recipients of dB-SERC course transformation awards for the 2018-2019 academic year. Ten faculty members and one postdoctoral student received awards to transform courses in biological sciences, physics, psychology, statistics, chemistry, and mathematics.
  • Read about the awards here

Accolades

  • Dr. Ben Rottman, psychology and LRDC research scientist, was awarded an NSF CAREER award. Dr. Rottman is a member of the dB-SERC faculty learning community and was awarded a dB-SERC course transformation award focused on helping students learn about causality in his research methods course.

                                                      


PUBLICATIONS

  • Drs. Ericka Huston, George Bandik, Jackie Powell, and others recently published a paper in the Journal of Chemical Education focused on the development of their chemistry safety course, for which they received a dB-SERC course transformation award. 
  • You can read the article here
  • Congratulations to the authors!

University Times Newsmakers

                     

  • Dr. Lillian Chong, faculty member in chemistry and member of the dB-SERC faculty learning community, leads a project to help undergraduate students learn how to communicate scientific research findings through creative nonfiction, journalism, and poetry. 
  • Read about it here!

Accolades

                                                                       

  • Dr. Russell Clark, senior lecturer in the physics and astronomy department and member of the dB-SERC faculty learning community, was awarded the Ampco-Pittsburgh Prize for Excellence in Advising. Dr. Clark is advisor to all undergraduate physics and astronomy major and is responsible for training graduate teaching assistants for lab courses. 
  • Read about it here!

CONGRATULATIONS

                                                                             

  • to Alan Sved, faculty member in the neuroscience department, for receiving the Chancellor's Distinguished Teaching Award! Dr. Sved is a member of the dB-SERC faculty learning community. 
  • Read about the award here.

REMINDER: Applications for dB-SERC course transformation awards are due January 31!

  • Click here for more info about course transformation awards
  • Click here for more detailed info about applying for the award
  • Email the associate director of dB-SERC Emily Marshman at dbserc@pitt.edu if you would like to discuss your ideas for a course transformation

Pittsburgh Post Gazette News

  • Dr. Russell Clark, physics and astronomy department and dB-SERC course transformation award winner, is featured in the Pittsburgh Post Gazette for his project with physics majors involving the Eclipse 2017. 

ACCOLADES

  • Congratulations to Dr. Chandralekha Singh, director of dB-SERC, for being named an American Association for the Advancement of Science Fellow. Read about it here.


  • Congratulations to Dr. Daniel Lambrecht, faculty member in the chemistry department and dB-SERC course transformation awardee, for winning the winner of the American Chemical Society OpenEye Outstanding Junior Faculty Award in Computational Chemistry. Read about it here

  • Dr. Lillian Chong, faculty member in the chemistry department and member of the dB-SERC faculty learning community, has has created the Creative Science Summer Writing Program for Undergraduates. Read about it here

POSTER SESSION AT PITT'S ANNUAL ASSESSMENT CONFERENCE

  • The University of Pittsburgh’s annual assessment conference will be held on Friday, January 26, 2018 at the University Club.
  • The conference will include a poster session at the end of the day.
  • We invite dB-SERC course transformation award winners to submit a proposal for the poster session that focuses on your course transformation and its outcomes. This is a wonderful opportunity for faculty to showcase their own work and learn from each other!
  • Submissions for the poster session are due by December 8. To submit a proposal, please fill out the Call for Posters form at http://tiny.cc/Posters2018.
  • If you present your poster at this conference, dB-SERC will also be happy to provide funding (up to $1,000) for you to present your course transformation at a conference outside of the University of Pittsburgh.
  • If you have any further questions, please email the dB-SERC associate director Emily Marshman @ dbserc@pitt.edu.  

dB-SERC REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

  • dB-SERC is accepting applications for course transformation awards
    • Click here for more info about course transformation awards
    • Click here for more detailed info about applying for the award
    • Applications due January 31, 2018
  • dB-SERC is accepting applications for mentor-mentee awards
    • Click here for more info about mentor-mentee awards
    • Applications are accepted on a rolling basis (no deadline)
  • ​dB-SERC is accepting applications for travel awards
    • Click here for more info about travel awards for faculty
    • Ciick here for more info about travel awards for students
    • Applications are accepted on a rolling basis (no deadline)

PITTWIRE NEWS

  • Dr. Melissa Libertus, a member of the dB-SERC community, was featured in the Pittwire news.

  • Read the article here!

University Times News

  • Recipients of dB-SERC course transformation awards featured in University Times article
  • Read the article here!

                                      


PITTWIRE NEWS

  • Recipients of dB-SERC course transformation awards mentioned in the "Accolades" section of Pittwire
  • Read the article here!

New dB-SERC Leadership Award

  • This award will be given to any full time faculty member in the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences who attends at least 15 dB-SERC lunch discussions, workshops, or seminars during the 2017-2018 academic year. The faculty member will be featured as a dB-SERC Leader for the following year and will also receive an award of $500. 
  • Click here for more details.

ACCOLADES

                            

  • to Dr. Chandralekha Singh for co-leading International Conference on Women in Physics
  • Read about it here!

CONGRATULATIONS 

  • to the recipients of dB-SERC course transformation awards. Ten faculty members received awards to transform courses in biological sciences, physics, geology and environmental science, statistics, and chemistry. 
  • Read about the awards here.

CONGRATULATIONS

  • to Dr. Lillian Chong from the chemistry department, who received the 2017 Tina and David Bellet Teaching Excellence Award. Dr. Chong is a member of the dB-SERC faculty community.

                          

  • to Dr. Alison Slinskey-Legg from the biological sciences department, who also received the 2017 Tina and David Bellet Teaching Excellence Award. Dr. Slinskey-Legg is a member of the dB-SERC faculty community. 

                   

  • Read about it here.

CONGRATULATIONS

  • to Dr. Sean Garrett-Roe, who received the Chancellor's Distinguished Teaching Award! Dr. Garrett-Roe was a recipient of a dB-SERC course transformation award to implement the use of technology and POGIL activities in his chemistry course.

                               

  • Read the article in the University Times here.

Upcoming dB-SERC diversity workshop: "Strategies to help women succeed in STEM professions"

  • Thursday, March 9 from 3- 5 pm, followed by a complimentary dinner 
  • Click here for more information and to sign up

dB-SERC course transformation proposals due March 1, 2017
  • Click here for more information.

Upcoming dB-SERC workshop for undergraduate teaching assistants on Friday, January 20
  • The workshop will focus on discipline-specific issues in the teaching and learning of Natural Sciences and discuss evidence-based strategies for improving the effectiveness of homework sessions and recitations/labs including but not limited to: creating a TA teaching community, fostering collaborative learning, improving student participation, and tailoring help provided to students' prior knowledge.
  • It will be followed by a reception during which complimentary food will be provided.  
  • Interested TAs can click here to sign up for the workshop

Motivation center speakers

  • Click here for motivation center speaker series.
  • November 15, 2016: Psychology is changing the world: The power of "wise" interventions
  • Greg Walton, Stanford University
  • 11-12 pm 5604 Posvar Hall

Pitt Chronicle features dB-SERC Course Transformation Awards in September 19 Issue

  • See the link to read about dB-SERC course transformation awards in the online issue of Pitt Chronicle 
  • Congratulations to faculty members who received the awards!

Upcoming dB-SERC New Faculty Workshop 

  • When: Tuesday August 23, 2016
  • Where: 321 Allen Hall from 9:00 am - 3: 00 pm
  • Interested faculty can sign up here.

CONGRATULATIONS

  • to Dr. Alan Sved, a faculty member in the neuroscience department and an active member of dB-SERC, who was the recipient of the 2016 Bellet Teaching Excellence Award. 
  • Watch a video about Dr. Sved's teaching philosophy here.

dB-SERC course transformation proposals due March 1, 2016

  • Click here for more information.

CONGRATULATIONS

  • to Dr. Nancy Pfenning, who received the Chancellor's Distinguished Teaching Award! Dr. Pfenning was a recipient of a dB-SERC course transformation award to implement the use of clickers in statistics courses.
  • Read the article in the Pitt Chronicle here.

NEW dB-SERC informational video - dB-SERC Mission Statement

  • Click here to learn about dB-SERC and the goals of the center

NEW dB-SERC informational video - Weekly dB-SERC Lunch Discussion

  • Click here to learn about dB-SERC weekly lunch discussions

NEW dB-SERC informational video - Course Transformation Award

  • Email dbserc@pitt.edu to request a link to a video involving a detailed description of a course transformation award which was funded by dB-SERC

NEW dB-SERC informational video - New Faculty Workshop

  •  Click here to watch a video about the dB-SERC New Faculty Workshop

NEW dB-SERC informational video - New Graduate Teaching Assistant Workshop

  • Click here to watch a video about the dB-SERC New Graduate Teaching Assistant Workshop

CIDDE workshop: Reducing stereotype threat in the classroom (Book discussion - Whistling Vivaldi)

  • Facilitator: Kevin Binning, PhD, psychology
  • When: February 3, 2016 from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: O'Hara Student Center
  • Register here

Congratulations

  • to Dr. Alexandru Maries, former dB-SERC postdoc, on his new appointment as assistant professor - educator at the University of Cincinnati!

Pitt-Cirtl Spring 2016 online course 

Preparation for the STEM Classroom: Advancing Learning Through Evidence-Based STEM Teaching

  • Topics which will be discussed include:
    • Learning through diversity
    • Cooperative learning/peer instruction
    • Inquiry-based labs
    • Problem-based learning
    • Flipped classroom pedagogy
  • faculty, postdocs, and graduate students can enroll
  • visit this link to sign up for the course  

September 14, 2015

  • dB-SERC course transformation awards and mentor-mentee awards are featured in an article in the Pitt Chronicle
  • Congratulations to the awardees!

March 30, 2015

dB-SERC featured in an article in Pitt Chronicle about using the flipped approach to teaching.
  • David Nero who received a grant from dB-SERC to flip his large enrollment introductory physics course discusses his instructional approach and student learning outcomes.

March 10, 2015:

Congratulations to Joe Grabowski for getting a proposal for improving graduate student success in Chemistry on which he is a PI recommended for funding!
  • Alexandru Maries, the dB-SERC post-doc is senior personnel on this proposal and he played an important role in designing the assessment and evaluation component. Part of the reason the proposal got recommended for funding is that the program manager really liked this component of this proposal.

December 10, 2014:

Dr. Alexandru Maries, a dB-SERC post-doc gave an invited talk at the Ohio State University PERG seminar.

October 24, 2014:

Dr. Alexandru Maries, a dB-SERC post-doc gave an invited talk at the Fall 2014 Meeting of the APS - Ohio Region Section titled "Role of Multiple Representations in Physics Problem Solving"

October 20, 2014: Innovative SEA-PHAGES program gets $3.25 million to continue

Congratulations to Dr. Graham Hatfull from Biological Sciences for obtaining this grant from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute!

Link to article in Pitt Chronicle


October 6, 2014: Improving Biology Education at Pitt

Dr. Samuel Donovan from Biological Sciences discusses the Quantitative Undergraduate Biology Education and Synthesis (QUBES) project for which he and colleagues at University of Wisconsin-Madison and The College of William and Mary were recently awarded a $2.9 million NSF grant.

September 10, 2014: Pittsburgh Quarterly:


September 4-5, 2014: Global Learning Council Inaugural Meeting and Symposium in Pittsburgh
Dr. Alexandru Maries, a post-doc for dB-SERC, presented a poster titled "Using Clickers (classroom response system) in physics classrooms to enhance student learning" at the GLC inaugural meeting on September 4.

August 18, 2014

dB-SERC sent out a request for proposals for establishment of Faculty Learning Communities (departmental or across departments) for Fall 2014 and Spring 2015.
  • Each faculty learning community should be focused on a particular or several instructional strategies (e.g., Just-in-Time Teaching, collaborative group problem solving, flipped classroom etc.)
  • More information.

May 5, 2014
Chandralekha Singh, Founding Director of dB-SERC, discusses the center in an article in Quanta


April 5, 2014
Alexandru Maries, a postdoc for dB-SERC, gave an invited presentation to the Western PA American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) Meeting, in Monessen, PA


April 3, 2014http://www.univsenate.pitt.edu/plenary-sessions

  • Chandralekha Singh, Founding Director of dB-SERC, gave a talk at  the annual Senate Plenary on using  technology before, during and after  the lecture.
  • The plenary on March 19th, 2014 was focused on using technology in the classroom, and is available here

Dr. Singh's talk, "Using Technology to Transform Science Teaching in Large Classes Before, During and After the Lecture" can be obtained by emailing her at clsingh@pitt.edu.

 


February 6, 2014

Article in University Times about dB-SERC's inauguration event (Carl Wieman seminar)


February 4, 2014
Article about the effectiveness of the SEA-PHAGE program implemented at Pitt, led by Dr. Graham Hatfull and 20 other universities published in mBio and discussed in The Chronicle of Higher Education.


January 30, 2014https://pitt.app.box.com/files/email/tac8@pitt.edu/0/f/1783318256
Carl Wieman gave the inaugural keynote address for dB-SERC. 

His talk, "Taking a Scientific Approach to Science Education" (powerpoint slides and video) are available!

Note: In order to view the seminar you need to have a University of Pittsburgh box account. If you  do not have one, you can create one for free using your pitt username and password, after which you will be able to download  the video.

If you are not affiliated with pitt, you can view Carl giving a very similar seminar talk at CMU's Simon Initiative, which is on youtube here.


January 15, 2014
dB-SERC inauguration in Pitt News


Participate!
Any Natural Sciences faculty member/graduate student interested in effective teaching and learning is encouraged to attend the weekly meetings to discuss these issues and contribute to the burgeoning Pitt teaching and learning community. For more information on how you can be involved, please contact dB-SERC Postdoctoral Teacher Scholar and Assessment Consultant, Dr. Emily Marshman at dbserc@pitt.edu.

 

dB-SERC Events

May 9, 2022: Designing Effective and Engaging Online Learning Experiences

  • When: Monday, May 9  from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, April 4th from 12 – 1 pm. During this lunch discussion, Dr. Zhongzhou Chen from UCF will give his talk “Designing Effective and Engaging Online Learning Experiences”.

Dr. Zhongzhou Chen earned his Ph.D. in physics from University of Illinois Urbana Champaign in 2012, specializing in physics education and multimedia learning. Prior to joining UCF in 2016, he conducted educational research in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) on the edX platform as a postdoc at MIT. His current research interests include designing and creating mastery-based online-learning environments for large introductory STEM courses, supporting students’ self-regulation in online learning, and understanding students’ learning behavior via analysis of clickstream data. He has also been a pioneer in using Microsoft Teams to teach in a flipped classroom setting in large STEM gateway courses.

Online learning has become an increasingly integral part of today's STEM education, especially since the COVID pandemic forced almost all instructors to adopt some form on online or remote instruction. However, the past two years have also made it clear that different online instructional design could result in drastically different student learning experience and learning outcomes. In this talk I will discuss three questions that are key to designing effective and engaging online learning experience for students. First, how can we create online learning tools and resources that better support student learning, based on analysis of student learning data? I will first introduce a new online instructional design, mastery-based online learning modules, which enables and encourages students with different levels of incoming knowledge to proceed at different pace. Moreover, careful analysis of clickstream data collected from online learning modules could enable instructors to continuously evaluate and improve the quality of learning resources. Second, how can we motivate student learning by using credit and non-credit incentives? In particular, for undergraduate students who are still developing their self-regulatory skills, how can we design effective scaffolding structure to support and encourage productive self-regulation of learning? I will share one example of encouraging planning and reducing cramming by a combination of extra-credit incentives and "nudging" technique. Finally, a strong sense of community and belonging is critical for students to consistently engage with learning in an online environment. How can we put the "human touch" in online learning by utilizing modern collaborative working platforms? I will share my experience in trying to engage a class of 250 students on Microsoft Teams during the pandemic, by utilizing instant messaging, threaded dialogues, emojis and internet memes.

Click here to register for the lunch discussion


April 18, 2022: Ecological Belonging Interventions

  • When: Monday, April 18  from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual

During this lunch discussion, Dr. Jeremy Levy and Dr. Kevin Binning from the Physics and Psychology Departments will give their second talk about their course transformation titled "Delivering Ecological Belonging Intervention Via Video".

Click here to register for the lunch discussion


April 11, 2022: Equity and Inclusion in Science Courses.

  • When: Monday, April 11  from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual

During this lunch discussion, Dr. Chandralekha Singh, Yangqiuting Li, Sonja Cwik, and Ly Malespina from the Physics Department will discuss issues related to equity and inclusion in science courses.

Click here to register for the lunch discussion


April 4, 2022: Engaging student scientists to promote inquiry based scientific skills

  • When: Monday, April 4  from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual

During this lunch discussion, Dr. Walter Carson from the Biology Department will give a talk on his course transformation “Engaging student scientists to enhance our understanding of forest degradation and promote inquiry based scientific skills”.

Click here to register for the lunch discussion


March 28, 2022: Instructor Talk Moves and Student Reasoning in Undergraduate STEM Classrooms

  • Topic: Instructor Talk Moves and Student Reasoning in Undergraduate STEM Classrooms
  • When: Monday, March 28  from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual

During this lunch discussion, Dr. Abdi Warfa from the University of Minnesota will give his talk "Towards Dialogical Pedagogy: Capturing Instructor Talk Moves and Student Reasoning in Undergraduate STEM Classrooms".

Click here to register for the lunch discussion


March 21, 2022: Integrating a Mindfulness Resource in a Large Undergraduate STEM Course

  • Topic: Integrating a Mindfulness Resource in a Large Undergraduate STEM Course
  • When: Monday, March 21  from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual

During this lunch discussion, Dr. Brian Galla from the School of Education will give his second talk about his course transformation on testing an integrating a mindfulness resource in a large undergraduate STEM Course.

Click here to register for the lunch discussion


March 14, 2022: Supporting Teachers to Encourage the Pursuit of Undergraduate Physics for Women

  • Topic: Supporting Teachers to Encourage the Pursuit of Undergraduate Physics for Women
  • When: Monday, March 14  from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual

During this lunch discussion, Dr. Zahra Hazari from FIU will give her talk “STEP UP: Supporting Teachers to Encourage the Pursuit of Undergraduate Physics for Women”.

Click here to register for the lunch discussion


February 28, 2022: Measuring mindset

  • Topic: Measuring mindset
  • When: Monday, February 28  from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual

During this lunch discussion, Dr. Lisa Limeri from Texas Tech will give her talk “Measuring mindset: the Undergraduate Lay Theories of Abilities (ULTrA) survey”.

Click here to register for the lunch discussion


February 21, 2022: Storytelling in Cell Biology

  • Topic: Storytelling in Cell Biology
  • When: Monday, February 21  from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual

During this lunch discussion, Dr. Kirill Kiselyov from the Biology Department will give his talk “Storytelling in Cell Biology”.

Click here to register for the lunch discussion


February 14, 2022: Backchannel for In-Class Questions and Student Belonging

  • Topic: Backchannel for In-Class Questions and Student Belonging
  • When: Monday, February 14  from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual

During this lunch discussion, Dr. Perry Samson from UMich will give his talk “Does a Backchannel for In-Class Questions Increase Students’ Sense of Belonging?”.

Click here to register for the lunch discussion


February 7, 2022: Physician Workforce Diversity

  • Topic: Physician Workforce Diversity
  • When: Monday, February 7  from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, February 7  from 12 – 1 pm.

During this lunch discussion, Dr. John Burkhardt from UMich will give his talk “Physician Workforce Diversity: Barriers to Change and Implications of the Status Quo”.

Click here to register for the lunch discussion


January 31, 2022: Identifying and lessening challenges for students with anxiety and depression

  • Topic: Identifying and lessening challenges for students with anxiety and depression
  • When: Monday, January 31  from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, January 31  from 12 – 1 pm.

During this lunch discussion, Dr. Katelyn Cooper from ASU will give her talk “How biology learning environments affect students with anxiety and depression: identifying and lessening challenges”.

Click here to register for the lunch discussion


January 24, 2022: Research Methods for Psychology: Flipping, Grading, and Cheating

  • Topic: Research Methods for Psychology: Flipping, Grading, and Cheating
  • When: Monday, January 24  from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, January 24  from 12 – 1 pm.

During this lunch discussion, Dr. Ben Rottman from the Psychology Department will lead his third course transformation discussion on flipped online classrooms for Research Methods in Psychology.

In this talk I will discuss a new flipped version of Research Methods in psychology. I have taught the course now as an entirely virtual class as well as in-person. I will talk about three main things. First, I will talk about lessons that I have learned about implementing a flipped class, especially about the amount of content and making iterative improvements. Second, I will talk about challenges that remain, especially around attendance policies and how students earn their grade and SPECS grading. Third, I will talk about a large cheating scandal that occurred in the class last semester having to do with take-home online tests. I will discuss how I identified the cheating, got 67 students to confess, and lessons I learned.

Click here to register for the lunch discussion


January 10, 2022: Preparing for a New Semester

  • Topic: Preparing for a New Semester
  • When: Monday, January 10  from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, January 10  from 12 – 1 pm.

During this lunch discussion, Dr. Chandralekha Singh from the Physics Department will lead a discussion focusing on some of the important issues related to teaching and learning that all instructors should reflect upon at the beginning of their courses and throughout.

Click here to register for the lunch discussion


December 6, 2021: Gender Disparities in Upper Division Physiology

  • Topic: Gender Disparities in Upper Division Physiology
  • When: Monday, December 6  from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, December 6  from 12 – 1 pm.

During this lunch discussion, Dr. Natalia Caporale from the University of California Davis will give her talk “Gender Disparities in Upper Division Physiology - Looking under the Hood”.

Click here to register for the lunch discussion


November 29, 2021: Teaching Troublesome Knowledge

  • Topic: Teaching Troublesome Knowledge
  • When: Monday, November 29  from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, November 29  from 12 – 1 pm.

During this dB-SERC lunch discussion, Dr. Linda Adler-Kassner from the University of California Santa Barbara will give her workshop on teaching students challenging information while reducing stereotype threat, minimizing the distance between faculty and instructors, and fostering students’ senses of self-efficacy and belonging.

Click here to register for the lunch discussion


November 15, 2021: Systematic Advantages in Introductory STEM Courses

  • Topic: Systematic Advantages in Introductory STEM Courses
  • When: Monday, November 15  from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, November 15  from 12 – 1 pm.

During this lunch discussion, Sarah Castle from Michigan State University will present her talk “A Multi-Institutional Analysis of Systematic Advantages in Introductory STEM Courses”.

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November 8, 2021: Web-based Data Acquisition to Improve Labs

  • Topic: Web-based Data Acquisition and Analyses to Improve Physiology Laboratory
  • When: Monday, November 8  from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, November 8  from 12 – 1 pm.

During this dB-SERC lunch discussion, Dr. Burhan Gharaibeh and Dr. Suzanna Gribble from the Biological Sciences Department will present the first talk for their course transformation “Transforming undergraduate physiology laboratory by using web-based data acquisition and analyses setup to run lab instruments”.

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November 1, 2021: Developing Scientific Writing Abilities

  • Topic: Developing Scientific Writing Abilities
  • When: Monday, November 1  from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, November 1  from 12 – 1 pm.

During this lunch discussion, Dr. Eugene Wagner from the Chemistry Department will present results from his course transformation “Developing Scientific Writing Abilities through Scaled, Guided, and Active Learning Cycles”.

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October 25, 2021: Personalized Student Learning

  • Topic: Personalized Student Learning in a Large Biological Science Classroom
  • When: Monday, October 25  from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, October 25  from 12 – 1 pm.

During this dB-SERC lunch discussion, Dr. Candice Damiani from the Biological Sciences Department will give her third and final talk on her course transformation “Using TopHat to personalize student learning and expand the scientific skillset in a large biological science classroom”.

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October 21, 2021: Author Interactions in Virtual Courses

  • Topic: Virtual learning, Primary Literature, and Author Interactions
  • When: Thursday, October 21  from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Thursday, October 21  from 12 – 1 pm.

During this dB-SERC lunch discussion, Dr. Jessica Stephenson, Rachael Kramp, and Faith Rovenolt from the Biological Sciences Department will give thier first mentor-mentee award talk titled “Increasing student belonging and self-efficacy while leveraging a virtual learning environment via primary literature and author interactions”.

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October 11, 2021: Remote Introductory Physics Labs

  • Topic: Rubrics, Remote Learning, and Collaboration in Intro Physics Labs
  • When: Monday, October 11  from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, October 11  from 12 – 1 pm.

During this dB-SERC lunch discussion, Dr. Russell Clark from the Physics Department will give his final course transformation talk titled "Rubrics, Remote Learning, and Collaboration in Intro Physics Labs".

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October 4, 2021: Office Hours

  • Topic: Office hours in large introductory STEM courses
  • When: Monday, October 4  from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, October 4  from 12 – 1 pm.

Dr. Eduardo Gonzalez Niño from the Molecular Cell and Developmental Biology Department at the University of California Santa Barbara will give a talk about office hours in large introductory STEM courses.

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September 27, 2021: Mastery-Based Grading

  • Topic: Mastery-based grading in Chemistry 1
  • When: Monday, September 27 from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual (sign up for the Zoom link)

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, September 27 from 12 – 1 pm.

Dr. Sean Garrett-Roe from the Chemistry department will give his first talk about his course transformation titled "Mastery-based grading in Chemistry 1".

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September 20, 2021: Active-learning for Calculus II

  • Topic: A research-based active-learning approach for Calculus II
  • When: Monday, September 20 from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual (sign up for the Zoom link)

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, September 20 from 12 – 1 pm.

Dr. Armin Schikorra from the Math Department will give his second talk about his course transformation titled "A research-based active-learning approach for Calculus II".

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September 13, 2021: Ecological Belonging Intervention

  • Topic: Building a Path to Success: Delivering Ecological Belonging Intervention Via Video
  • When: Monday, September 13 from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual (sign up for the Zoom link)

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, September 13 from 12 – 1 pm.

Dr. Jeremy Levy and Dr. Kevin Binning from the Physics and Psychology Departments will give their second talk about their course transformation titled "Delivering Ecological Belonging Intervention Via Video".

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September 7, 2021: Building a Path to Success

  • Topic: Building a Path to Success: Improving Learning Experiences through Constructive Alignment of Course Components
  • When: Tuesday, September 7 from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual (sign up for the Zoom link)

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Tuesday, September 7 from 12 – 1 pm.

Dr. Renée Cole from the University of Iowa will give a talk talk titled "Building a Path to Success: Improving Learning Experiences through Constructive Alignment of Course Components". The abstract is below:

Many instructors approach to course design is focused on content without explicitly considering the intended outcomes (what students should know and be able to do), how knowledge and skills will be developed through instruction, or how each intended outcome will be assessed. By ensuring that learning outcomes, assessments, and instructional actions are aligned, instructors provide students with coherent curricular opportunities to develop their knowledge and skills and increase the likelihood that instructional actions are appropriate to achieving the desired learning outcomes. Before instructors can align these curricular components, they must first reflect on each of these components individually and how they can support student success. When designing learning outcomes, instructors must have a clear picture of the knowledge that students should gain and determine the performance expectations, which relates to how students should demonstrate their knowledge. These outcomes must also be clearly articulated so that students understand what is necessary for success in a course or activity. 
Marzano’s taxonomy provides a useful (and practical) way to think about developing learning objectives, activities, and assessments. The levels are based on the degree of cognitive control or intentionality of the thought processes needed to complete a task. Well-designed learning objectives serve many purposes: they guide curriculum development, guide assessment, and help students direct and monitor their learning process. With the increased emphasis on creating active learning environments to better support student learning, it is important to consider what aspects of activity design and implementation are effective in supporting student learning. We have used Marzano’s taxonomy to characterize instructional tasks from a variety of contexts and have extended this work to analyze classroom discourse to investigate how task design can influence student engagement. This work provides insights into how instructors can design and align course components to develop more effective learning environments. 

Bio: Renée Cole is a Professor of Chemistry at the University of Iowa. Her research focuses on issues related to how students learn chemistry and how that guides the design of instructional materials and teaching strategies as well on efforts related to faculty development and the connection between chemistry education research and the practice of teaching. She is an Associate Editor for the Journal of Chemical Education and has been a co-editor for two books focusing on chemistry education research. She is a Fellow of the American Chemical Society (2015) and was named as a CLAS Collegiate Scholar in 2018. She was awarded the Iowa Women of Innovation Award for Academic Innovation & Leadership (2014), the University of Central Missouri College of Science & Technology Award for Excellence in Teaching (2010), and the Missouri Governor’s Award for Excellence in Education (2009).

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August 30, 2021: Lessons from Remote Learning

  • Topic: Lessons from Remote Learning 
  • When: Monday, August 30 from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual (sign up for the Zoom link)

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, August 30 from 12 – 1 pm.

Dr. Chandralekha Singh will lead a discussion on lessons learned from remote learning that can be used for in-person and online courses.

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August 16, 2021: Evidence-Based Approaches

  • Topic: Evidence-Based Approaches to Curriculum Reform and Assessment
  • When: Monday, August 16 from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual (sign up for the Zoom link)

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, August 16 from 12 – 1 pm.

Dr. Melanie M Cooper from Michigan State University will give a talk titled "Evidence-Based Approaches to Curriculum Reform and Assessment". The abstract is below:

There is growing body of work from the learning sciences providing us with insights into how people learn; and from Discipline Based Education Research (DBER) we know what discipline-specific difficulties students face. However, it is quite surprising that relatively little of this understanding has made its way into the design of science and engineering curricula offered at most colleges and universities. This presentation will focus on the need for evidence-based curriculum transformations, the research findings that can guide them and how we might assess the results of these transformations. An approach to systemic reform that focuses on core ideas, scientific practices, and cross-cutting concepts, will be discussed. Examples of such curriculum reform efforts “Chemistry, Life, the Universe and Everything” (CLUE) and the subsequent organic chemistry version (OCLUE), will be presented, along with the evidence to support such transformations.

Bio: Melanie Cooper is the Lappan-Phillips Professor of Science Education and Professor of Chemistry at Michigan State University. Her recent research includes the development and assessment of chemistry curricula based on theories of learning and evidence about how people learn, the impact on student learning, and how students perceive these transformed curricula. She was a member of the leadership team for the development of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and has served as a member on the National Academy of Sciences Board on Science Education (BOSE), and for reports on Discipline Based Education Research (DBER), and Undergraduate Research Experiences (URE). She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry, the American Chemical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She has received a number of awards including the Royal Society of Chemistry Education Award, the American Chemical Society Award for Achievement in Research on Teaching and Learning in Chemistry, the Norris award for Outstanding Achievement in Teaching of Chemistry, the Outstanding Undergraduate Science Teacher Award from the Society for College Science Teaching, and was awarded an honorary D.Sc. from the University of South Florida. She earned her B.S. M.S. and Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Manchester, England. 

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July 26, 2021: Multiple Representations

  • Topic: Students' Understandings of Multiple Representations
  • When: Monday, July 26 from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual (sign up for the Zoom link)

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, July 26 from 12 – 1 pm.

Dr. Stacey Bretz from Miami University will give a talk titled "Students' Understandings of Multiple Representations". The abstract is below:

Learning in STEM courses requires students to become fluent in the symbolic language of the particular discipline. Developing expertise, however, requires that students move beyond manipulating symbols to creating explanations using particulate models of matter for observations in the laboratory. Failure to accurately interpret and connect these multiple representations of matter creates challenges for students when learning. Our research group designs measurement tools to advance our understanding of how students understand and interpret representations for a variety of core concepts. Findings regarding students’ reasoning with multiple representations and the implications for assessment will be presented using examples from multiple chemistry courses.

Bio: Stacey Lowery Bretz is an ACE Fellow for 2021-2022. She is the Special Assistant to the Provost for Academic Initiatives at Miami University in Oxford, OH where she holds the rank of University Distinguished Professor. She earned her B.A. in chemistry from Cornell University in 1989 and an M.S. in chemistry from Penn State in 1992. She earned her Ph.D. in chemistry education research (CER) at Cornell University in 1994 and completed a post-doc in CER in the Department of Chemistry at UC Berkeley. Dr. Bretz's research expertise includes the development of assessments to characterize students’ understanding of multiple representations (particulate, symbolic, and macroscopic) and learning in the chemistry laboratory. Of particular interest is method development to generate cognitive dissonance, including protocols for establishing the reliability and validity of these measures.  ​

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July 12, 2021: Assessment in Physics Education

  • Topic: Advancing Assessment in Physics Education with an Eye to Equity and Inclusion
  • When: Monday, July 12 from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual (sign up for the Zoom link)

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, July 12 from 12 – 1 pm.

Dr. Rachel Henderson from Michigan State University will give a talk titled "Advancing Assessment in Physics Education with an Eye to Equity and Inclusion". The abstract is below:

The field of Physics Education Research (PER) has made major contributions to various educational practices and materials to reform instruction in order to recruit and retain more students. However, while many research-based instructional strategies in physics have continued to advance, reform in undergraduate physics assessment has had limited space in these conversations and needs more attention. As educators, we would like to prepare our students for 21st century careers. In addition to providing the robust set of skills that students are expected to have after receiving a degree in physics, the physics community seeks to increase diversity within our classrooms. Overall, to ensure all students will become successful scientists, physics departments need to be able to provide evidence to make sure that we are reaching these goals. The importance of fairness and equity in assessment for undergraduate Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education is greater than ever.  In this talk, I will motivate, through my prior research experiences, the need for the next generation of physics assessments and discuss a few efforts that have been happening at Michigan State University. Advancing the practices and tools of assessment in physics, so that they are valid, fair, and effective, can better provide equal educational access and better ensure success for our students.

Bio: Rachel earned her Bachelor of Science degree in physics from Slippery Rock University in Pennsylvania. She then went on to do her graduate work at West Virginia University where she completed her Master’s and PhD in physics. A little over two years ago, she moved to Michigan where she did her postdoctoral work in collaboration with Danny Caballero in the Physics Education Research Lab at Michigan State University. Rachel is currently the newest Assistant Professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy and the CREATE for STEM Institute at MSU. She also served as a member-at-large for the APS Topical Group on Data Science and currently serves on the APS Topical Group on Physics Education Research. She was most recently nominated to serve on the American Association of Physics Teacher Physics Education Research Leadership and Organizing Council (PERLOC). In general, Rachel’s research focuses on developing and implementing inclusive and equitable assessment tools that can be used to improve learning for all students within the physics classroom.

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June 28, 2021: Culture-Based Equitable Approaches

  • Topic: Culture-Based Equitable Approaches to Physics Teaching
  • When: Monday, June 28 from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual (sign up for the Zoom link)

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, June 28 from 12 – 1 pm.

Dr. Clausell Mathis from the University of Washington will give a talk titled "Culture-Based Approaches to Physics Teaching". The abstract is below:

Dr. Clausell Mathis will describe research he has done on strategies and methods that physics teachers can use to achieve equitable based instruction through cultural relevance. Clausell will describe research he has done with secondary physics teachers who attempt to incorporate culturally relevant pedagogy features in their classrooms. Findings show that teachers showed the strongest indicators of culturally relevant pedagogy willingness to address sensitive topics, consistent encouragement of students toward academic excellence, and the ability to adapt the curriculum to students' strengths. Findings from Dr. Mathis's research give implications for physics teachers who wish to become more equitable in their instruction. He will also discuss the challenges and affordances that may occur when making pedagogical changes that support culturally relevant instruction. 

Bio: Dr. Mathis is currently a postdoctoral scholar at the University of Washington-Seattle. His research focuses on how physics teachers develop equitable based practices in the teaching of energy ideas. Additionally, Dr. Mathis is currently studying how resource-oriented instruction changes students' mechanistic reasoning when solving physics problems.

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June 21, 2021: Developing a Laboratory Component

  • Topic: Developing a Laboratory Component for GEOL 1515: Environmental Chemistry
  • When: Monday, June 21 from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual (sign up for the Zoom link)

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, June 21 from 12 – 1 pm.

Dr. Kyle Whittinghill from the Department of Geology and Environmental Science will give her second presentation about her new course transformation, "Developing a Laboratory Component for GEOL 1515: Environmental Chemistry," in which she developed a brand-new lab component to enhance this essential course for environmental science majors. The purpose of this talk is to share ideas and feedback on the development of this new lab component which will be implemented in Fall 2021.

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June 7, 2021: Universal Design for Learning

  • Topic: Universal Design for Learning
  • When: Monday, June 7 from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual (sign up for the Zoom link)

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, June 7 from 12 – 1 pm.

Dr. Erin Scanlon from the University of Connecticut will give a talk on Universal Design for Learning. The abstract is below:

This talk will introduce participants to the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework as a tool to design instruction and curricula that support variation in learners’ needs, abilities and interests. The UDL guidelines emphasize providing supports and options for how students receive information (representation), demonstrate their understanding (action and expression), and engage with the content (engagement). Attendees will have the opportunity to: 1) reflect on their role in designing instruction that supports learner variability; and 2) practice applying the UDL guidelines to identify barriers in the learning environment and to design options and supports in sample written curricula and instructional scenarios.

Erin Scanlon (she/her) is an Assistant Professor in Residence at University of Connecticut - Avery Point in the Department of Physics. She received a B.S. in physics at Michigan Technological University, a M.S. in physics at Georgia Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. in developmental education at Texas State University. Dr. Scanlon conducts physics education research focusing on supporting viability in peoples' needs, abilities, and interests in STEM.

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May 25, 2021: Supporting Inclusive Physics Community through a Learning Assistant Progam

  • Topic: Learning Assistants
  • When: Tuesday, May 25 from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual (sign up for the Zoom link)

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Tuesday, May 25 from 12 – 1 pm.

Dr. Eleanor Close from Texas State University  will give a talk on a Learning Assistants Program . The abstract is below:

The physics department at Texas State University has implemented a Learning Assistant (LA) program in all sections of our calculus-based introductory physics sequence. Our LA program is structured specifically to create an inclusive community and develop a shared culture of mutual support. Program structures are informed by the theory of Communities of Practice, which describes learning as an ongoing process shaped by participation in overlapping communities. In interviews and written reflections, LAs describe changing their ways of learning and of being students, both within and beyond physics, as a result of their LA experience. In addition, they have a stronger sense of belonging to a supportive and collaborative community of peers, near-peers, and faculty. This positively impacts both retention of majors and recruitment of physics students into teaching careers. In this talk I will describe two related research projects that explore the impact of LA program participation on the LAs’ physics identity and sense of belonging. In one ongoing study, we analyze video data of weekly LA preparation sessions using the theoretical framework of Communities of Practice to understand how LAs’ interactions during these sessions impact their physics identity as enacted in the community. In a related study of intersectional physics identity, physics students with multiple marginalized identities—defined as Women of Color and LGBTQ+ women—shared their unique experiences and reflections on their identity as physicists in semi-structured clinical interviews.

Dr. Eleanor Close is an Associate Professor of Physics at Texas State University and a physics education researcher. She directs the TXST Physics Learning Assistant Program, co-organizes regional and national workshops through the National Learning Assistant Alliance, and is currently PI of an NSF Noyce Phase I Scholarship project and Co-PI on two NSF HSI projects. Her research interests include physics teacher preparation and professional development, physics teacher identity, situated learning and identity development through communities of practice, and Learning Assistant program impacts on students, LAs, and faculty. She received her Physics M.S. from the University of Washington in 2003 and her Ed.D. in Curriculum & Instruction from Seattle Pacific University in 2009. Between receiving her B.A. in Physics from Bryn Mawr College and starting graduate school, she taught high school physics and physical science for three years in rural North Carolina, where she became science department chair by seniority after teaching for five months. In her non-work life, she co-parents three teen/tween children with her husband Dr. Hunter Close, also a physics professor at TXST.

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May 17, 2021: ECoach

  • Topic: ECoach
  • When: Monday, May 17 from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual (sign up for the Zoom link)

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, May 17 from 12 – 1 pm.

Dr. Jessica Wandelt, Dr. Jennifer Ganger, and Dr. Kitty Liu  will give their second talk on their course transformation. The abstract is below:

ECoach is a personalized coaching tool developed at the University of Michigan that allows tailored communication and interventions for students in large enrollment courses. ECoach allows professors to personalize feedback to students, supporting student success in the short term, as well as in the long-term by promoting meta-cognitive and self-regulatory skills. We expect to see an increase in grades and a decrease in DFW rate for students who engage with the platform.

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April 19, 2021: Developing a Laboratory Component

  • Topic: Developing a Laboratory Component for GEOL 1515: Environmental Chemistry
  • When: Monday, April 19 from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual (sign up for the Zoom link)

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, April 19 from 12 – 1 pm.

Dr. Kyle Whittinghill from the Department of Geology and Environmental Science will give her second presentation about her new course transformation, "Developing a Laboratory Component for GEOL 1515: Environmental Chemistry," in which she developed a brand-new lab component to enhance this essential course for environmental science majors. The purpose of this talk is to share ideas and feedback on the development of this new lab component which will be implemented in Fall 2021.

Click here to register for the lunch discussion


 

April 12, 2021: Integrating Python into Chem 1000

  • Topic: Integrating Python and Computing into Chem 1000 - Undergraduate Mathematics for Chemists
  • When: Monday, April 12 from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual (sign up for the Zoom link)

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, April 12 from 12 – 1 pm.

Dr. Geoffrey Hutchison from the chemistry department will give a talk about his experience introducing Python and Jupyter notebooks in Fall 2020 as part of Chem 1000. The abstract is below:

While computational science has become an increasingly important part of chemistry research, the standard undergraduate curriculum has often not included either foundations for students to gain such skills, or examples of the use of computational methods and data science to solve real-world problems. Students can, in principle, gain such skills in applied mathematics, statistics, and computer science or scientific computing courses. At the same time, applications to chemistry and other physical science are often lacking. Thus, a key strategy is to include some level of coding and computational programming skills integrated into chemistry courses – to give all chemistry students some competence and allow interested students to pursue additional avenues including research and upper-level coursework.

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April 5, 2021: Storytelling in Cell Biology

  • Topic: Evaluating the Impact of the “Storytelling in Cell Biology” Approach
  • When: Monday, April 5 from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual (sign up for the Zoom link)

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, April 5 from 12 – 1 pm.

Dr. Kirill Kiselyov from the biology department will give his second talk on his course transformation. The purpose of this discussion is to share ideas and provide feedback. The abstract is below:

The science of cell biology integrates biochemistry of molecular interactions into the cell- or tissue-wide context. Many undergraduate students struggle aggregating cell biological knowledge components into a complete picture and incorporating research literature into the learning process. To address this problem I transformed an undergraduate cell biology class by introducing a concept of storylines that are selected by groups of students for development throughout the semester. Each storyline integrates molecular and organellar concepts discussed during the semester into the cell- and tissue-level functions, conditions or diseases, shared and discussed during online poster sessions. Three semester-long studies conducted with an undergraduate cell biology class at the University of Pittsburgh utilized pre- and post-assignment assessments of confidence and specific knowledge gains, which show that both parameters are significantly improved following each assignment. Other high cognitive level activities accompanying this approach include questions to the audience formulated by the presenting groups, which, for some groups, showed marked improvement during the semester. The surveys of attitude and factual knowledge  administered at the end of the semester suggest that the approach is seen as beneficial and enriching. I conclude that it is possible to vertically integrate a complicated class using storytelling and that such integration is positive and useful.

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March 29, 2021: Advancing Equity and Inclusion

  • Topic: Advancing Equity and Inclusion Through The Use of Evidence and Educational Development
  • When: Monday, March 29 from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual (sign up for the Zoom link)

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, March 29 from 12 – 1 pm.

Dr. Marco Molinaro and Kem Saichaie from the University of California at Davis will give a talk on advancing equity and inclusion through the use of evidence and educational development. The abstract is below:

At UC Davis we have explored student outcomes and differential success for many years. Knowing who leaves and when gives us a strong indication of the importance of the first two years and the challenges in providing an equitable learning experience for our students. We have built tools and extended experiences for faculty to help them succeed in their instructional endeavors. These efforts engage the faculty in a Cycle of Progress for sustainable change that consist of 4 cyclical phases - Awareness, Understanding, Action, Reflection, and repeat. Through the use of tools like our Know Your Students dashboard, relevant and accessible teaching materials found in our JITT series,  and a range of educational development programs such as ACCELERATE, CREATE and PCI, we are making steady progress. During this seminar we will explore and discuss some examples of approaches to support pedagogical innovation in an effort to create an inclusive and equitable learning environment.

Marco Molinaro is is the Assistant Vice Provost for Educational Effectiveness at UC Davis where he created and oversees the Center for Educational Effectiveness (CEE). The CEE team focuses on empowering instructors and staff, improving the educational system and fostering educational innovation and discovery in service of removing disparities in undergraduate student outcomes while maximizing learning. Dr. Molinaro has over 25 years of educational experience creating and leading applications of academic analytics, technology for instruction, scientific visualization and simulation, curriculum development and evaluation. His most recent work focuses on student equity and inclusion through: 1) being Co-PI of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Inclusive Excellence project MIDAS  2) acting as the UCD campus PI for the SEISMIC collaborative and co-leading the 10 institution based Structures working group  and 3) serving as chair of the Analytics Sub-Committee and Advisory Board member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) STEM Equity Achievement (SEA) Change initiative. Molinaro has served on National Academy of Science, APLU and numerous NSF grant-related committees and received funding from the NSF, NIH and various private foundations such as Gates, Intel, the Helmsley Trust and HHMI. 

Kem Saichaie is an Associate Director of the Center for Educational Effectiveness (CEE) at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis). He works with faculty and graduate students across disciplines to investigate evidence-based pedagogical practices and integrate them into face-to-face, hybrid, and online learning spaces. Kem’s experience in higher education includes roles in academic technology, admissions, educational development, and as a faculty member. As an educator, Kem has taught courses at University of California, Davis, University of Iowa, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, and University of Minnesota – Twin Cities. Kem earned a PhD Higher Education and Student Affairs from the University of Iowa. He was named an American Education Research Association (Division J – Postsecondary Education) Emerging Scholar in 2012. Prior to work in education, Kem spent nearly a decade working in mass media.

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March 22, 2021: Appropriate Instructional Design Decisions

  • Topic: Making Appropriate Instructional Design Decisions to Motivate Students to Engage
  • When: Monday, March 22 from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual (sign up for the Zoom link)

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, March 22 from 12 – 1 pm.

Dr. Kathy Koenig from the University of Cincinnati will give a talk on making appropriate instructional design decisions to motivate students to engage. The abstract is below:

Many of us have experienced putting in long hours designing what we believe to be the perfect “lecture”, activity, or homework assignment, only to find that our students didn’t learn as much as we had hoped. An important part of instructional design that is often overlooked is considering students’ motivation for engaging in a given task, which is naturally related to how much they learn. This presentation will showcase several strategies implemented in a large enrollment face-to-face introductory physics course that led to increased student engagement and learning, when compared to parallel sections of the same course. In addition, given that many of us are teaching online due to the pandemic, this presentation will also showcase an online learning tool, developed under NSF funding, that was designed in part around specific strategies to engage students in their own learning. The strategies that will be discussed are general such that they can be transferred to both in-person and online courses across multiple disciplines.  

Dr. Kathy Koenig is a Professor of Physics at the University of Cincinnati, with her research in physics education. She has extensive experience in the development and evaluation of pedagogies and curriculum that support student success in college-level science and math courses. Since 2006, she has been funded by NSF and/or NIH to investigate the development and evaluation of curriculum that advances student scientific reasoning abilities. This work also involves the development of reasoning assessments for students in various age groups, including middle school through college. Funding since 2014 has centered on the development of interactive, web-based learning modules to enhance student conceptual understanding and problem solving abilities. She is a Fellow of the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT). 

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March 16, 2021: Flipping Research Methods in Psychology

  • Topic: Flipping Research Methods in Psychology and Using Specs Grading
  • When: Tuesday, March 16 from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual (sign up for the Zoom link)

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Tuesday, March 16 from 12 – 1 pm. Dr. Ben Rottman from the psychology department from the department of physics will give his second talk on his course transformation. The purpose of this discussion is to share ideas and provide feedback. The abstract is below:

During Fall of 2020 I implemented a flipped version of research methods for Psychology majors. In this flipped implementation, almost every class had at least 50% of time dedicated to student discussion in small groups. I also implemented SPECS grading. I will discuss a number of successes - most notably students found the group work highly engaging. I will also discuss some of the challenges - most notably students complained that the workload was very high, and the benefits of working with undergrads to help design activities. I will try to draw broader lessons about flipping classrooms. 

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March 8, 2021: Intro 360 for Psychology

  • Topic: Intro 360: A proposal for a customizable and interactive educational experience for Introduction to Psychology students
  • When: Monday, March 8 from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual (sign up for the Zoom link)

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place Monday, March 8 from 12 – 1 pm. Heather Bruett and Dr. Robert Wozniak from the psychology department will share results from their mentee/mentor project. The project developed Intro 360: a program designed for all Intro students that aims to preserve the benefits of recitation and address its limitations by engaging students more directly with psychological research through small group discussions, online tutorials, and opportunities to learn about research taking place in the department through guided experiences. The purpose of the lunch discussion is to reflect on the results and outcomes from this exciting initiative. 

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March 1, 2021: Individualized Instruction for Physics 1

  • Topic: Individualized Instruction for Physics 1
  • When: Monday, March 1 from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual (sign up for the Zoom link)

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place on Monday, March 1 from 12 – 1 pm. Dr. David Nero from the department of physics will give his second talk on his course transformation. This transformation builds on his past success using flipped pedagogy, and aims to provide students with a choice of supplemental material connecting core videos. The purpose of this discussion is to share ideas and provide feedback.

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February 22, 2021: Exploring Men and Women's Roles in Physics Lab Group Work

  • Topic: Exploring Men’s and Women’s Roles in Physics Lab Group Work
  • When: Monday, February 22 from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual (sign up for the Zoom link)

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place on Monday, February 22 from 12 – 1 pm. Dr. Natasha Holmes from Cornell University  will give a talk on exploring men and women's roles in physics lab group work.

The abstract is as follows: 

While group work is common in most introductory physics labs, research in physics education has found that students' experiences in those groups are not necessarily in common. I'll discuss our recent work evaluating how students participate in the hands-on aspects of physics labs, particularly illuminating imbalances between men's and women's participation. I'll also describe how nuances in students' perceptions of these experiences and differences in single-gender versus mixed-gender groups motivate different types of instructional interventions (or even no intervention at all!).

Natasha G. Holmes is the Ann S. Bowers assistant professor in the Department of Physics at Cornell University, with the Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics. Dr. Holmes received her B.Sc. in physics from the University of Guelph and her M.Sc. and PhD in physics at the University of British Columbia. Her graduate work involved designing, implementing, and evaluating innovative pedagogies for undergraduate physics labs. She then went on to do her postdoctoral work at Stanford University working with Dr. Carl Wieman. Her research group studies many aspects of student learning, attitudes, and skill development from hands-on laboratory experiences, with a focus on critical thinking and experimentation. She also explores issues of equity and diversity in physics and methodological issues and techniques in physics education research.

Click here to register for the lunch discussion


February 15, 2021: Transitioning to a Student-Center Communication Model

  • Topic: Transitioning from a Faculty-Centered Communication Model to a Student-Centered Communicatin Model
  • When: Monday, February 15 from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual (sign up for the Zoom link)

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place on Monday, February 15 from 12 – 1 pm. Dr. Rebecca Lindell from Tiliadal Solutions for STEM Higher Education and Dr. Rebecca Rosenblatt, a AAAS-Science Technology Policy Fellow,  will give a talk on transiting from a faculty-centered communication model to a student-centered communication model. The abstract is as follows: 

We as faculty are experts in science and some of us are even experts at science communication. However, we are not always expert at the interpersonal communication skills necessary to communicate effectively with our students. Traditionally, faculty utilize a variation of a faculty-centered communication model, where students must come to them and must learn how to communicate with them. Couple this with the belief that a professor’s time is more valuable than a student’s and this presents a huge stumbling block for many students who would rather drop or withdraw from the class than seek out the help they desperately want and need. An alternative communication model is a student-centered communication model, which focuses on faculty reaching out to students and using communication to help us communicate with our students to both not only learn the course content and but also thrive in the college environment. This model of communication requires faculty to become cognizant of the students’ needs and difficulties both with the content and in their personal lives.  In this talk, we will discuss ways for centering the student in your communication strategies as well as what we believe we should be communicating to the students beyond basic course information to help them succeed.

Rebecca Lindell, PhD, is an interdisciplinary-based STEM Education Research consultant specializing in Physics and Astronomy Education and Education Research. With over 25 years experiences in these fields, she specializes in Discipline-based education research design and methods, specifically targeted at the development of assessment and evaluation materials. Rebecca developed the Lunar Phases Concept Inventory (LPCI) as well as being part of the team that developed the Astronomy Diagnostic Test (ADT).   She has conducted two meta-analyses of concept inventory development methodologies: the first focused on concept inventories in Physics and Astronomy in 2006 and the second in 2015, which focused on all the published concept inventories in the different STEM fields. Rebecca has suffered from Multiple Sclerosis for over twenty-five years and needed to go on disability from her physics faculty position at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville in 2008.  She founded Tiliadal Solutions for STEM Higher Education in 2014 to allow her to continue to contribute to the fields of STEM education and education research. 

Dr. Rosenblatt received her Ph.D. in physics from The Ohio State University. She has worked as a discipline-based education researcher in physics education research for several years. Rebecca has extensive experience in curriculum design and best practices in evaluation and assessment. Dr. Rosenblatt is also led the secondary physics teacher preparation program at Illinois State University for several years and is generally interested in undergraduate student mentorship and broadening participation and achievement in STEM.  She is currently working at NSF/EHR/DUE as a AAAS-STP fellow focusing on STEM education evaluation strategy and research. 

Click here to register for the lunch discussion


February 8, 202: Testing the testing Effect in a Real Class

  • Topic: Testing the Testing Effect in a Real Class
  • When: Monday, February 8 from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual (sign up for the Zoom link)

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place on Monday, February 8 from 12 – 1 pm. Dr. Jennifer Ganger from the Psychology department will give her third and final talk on her course transformation. The purpose of the lunch discussion is to reflect on the impact of this work. 

Click here to register for the lunch discussion


February 1, 2021: Challenges for Students with Disabilities

  • Topic: Challenges for Students with Disabilities
  • When: Monday, February 1 from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual (sign up for the Zoom link)

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place on Monday, February 1 from 12 – 1 pm. Dr. Sara Brownell from Arizona State University will lead a discussion about challenges for students with disabilities in active learning, undergraduate research, and the transition to online in college STEM. The abstract is as follows: 

Students with disabilities are one of the most underrepresented groups in STEM.  Although universities are legally required to provide accommodations for students with disabilities, changing college learning environments present challenges for students with disabilities to receive the accommodations that they need.  This talk highlights work that we have done exploring the experiences of students with disabilities in active learning courses, in online courses after the rapid transition online due to COVID-19, and the experiences of students with disabilities in undergraduate research experiences.  This work illuminates current challenges for students with disabilities and ways that universities can better support students with disabilities.      

Sara Brownell is an Associate Professor in the School of Life Sciences at Arizona State University.  She received her B.S. degree in biology from Cornell University, a M.S. in biology from The Scripps Research Institute, a M.A. in education from Stanford University, and a Ph.D. in biology from Stanford University.  She completed two postdoctoral fellowships working with Dr. Kimberly Tanner at San Francisco State University and Dr. Scott Freeman, Mary Pat Wenderoth, and Alison Crowe at the University of Washington.  Sara is a biology education researcher who explores how we can make undergraduate STEM learning experiences more inclusive, specifically for women, LGBTQ+ students, religious students, and students with disabilities.  She is a proud recipient of the 2020 LGBTQ+ Educator of the Year award and her work has been featured in popular news outlets including the New York Times, NPR, and the Onion.   

Click here to register for the lunch discussion


January 25, 2020: Assessments during Remote Instruction

  • Topic: Assessments during Remote Instruction
  • When: Monday, January 25 from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual (sign up for the Zoom link)

The next dB-SERC lunch discussion will take place on Monday, January 25 from 12 – 1 pm. Dr. Chandralekha Singh and Dr. David Nero will lead a discussion on making assessments meaningful in remote learning environments. 

Click here to register for the lunch discussion


January 21, 2021: Goal-Based Scenarios for Enviornmental Professionals

Note: this talk has been re-scheduled from Wednesday, Jan 20.

  • Topic: Development of Goal-Based Scenarios for Enviornmental Professionals
  • When: Thursday, January 21 from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual (sign up for the Zoom link)

During this dB-SERC lunch discussion, Dr. Danielle Andrews-Brown will share information about her course transformation on the development of goal-based scenarios to enhance the communication and collaborative decision-making skills for environmental professionals. Real-world socio-environmental scenarios are incorporated into GEOL 1313 to provide students the necessary tools to collect and synthesize information and effectively communicate as a group. This week, preliminary information on the success of the course transformation will be discussed.

Click here to register for the lunch discussion


January 13, 2021: Reflections on Remote Teaching

  • Topic: Reflections on remote teaching
  • When: Wednesday, January 13 from 12 - 1 pm
  • Where: Virtual (sign up for the Zoom link)

During this dB-SERC lunch discussion, Dr. Chandralekha Singh and Danny Doucette will lead a discussion on reflections of remote teaching and learning.

 

Click here to register for the lunch discussion


 

News and Events from 2020 can be found here.

News and Events from 2019 can be found here.

News and Events from 2018 can be found here.

News and Events from 2017 can be found here.

News and Events from 2016 can be found here.

News and Events from 2015 can be found here.

News and Events from 2014 can be found here.